Lindsay, Haley, Bobbi, Joy -- checked by Mrs R. on Monday, March 23 -- some progress, but needs massive amounts of work. You have until Friday. Wow me!!

Chapters 36-43

Chapter 36:

♥ Characters ♥
• Miss Alice Ann
• Lightfoot
• Mr. Slocum
• Miss Effie Belle Tate
• Mary Toy
• Uncle Lige

♥ Setting ♥
• The Cemetery


♥ Themes ♥
• Prejudice
• Forgiveness
• Acceptance

♥ Thematic Element ♥
• Accepting that Will and Lightfoot have a connection.


♥ Quotes ♥
• " Stay away from them folks, son. They all sorry and no-count and good for nothin. You ain't a bad boy, Will. You was just lead astray." - Miss Effie Belle Tate Page 249

• " Pa, have you forgot we're in mournin? Loma caint wear a white dress." - Momma Page 249

• "Hit jest depends." -Grandpa Page 248

• " Doin no tellin what." -Aunt Loma Page 250

♥ Chapter 36 Summary ♥

Will tells all of the memories about kissing Lightfoot. Hoyt is very mad at Will for what he did. He punishes him by spanking him. He also cant drive for two weeks. In the mean time Loma and Rucker return from New York. Mary Willis erases Miss Loves name from the book.





Chapter 37

♥ Characters ♥

• Aunt Carrie
• Mrs. Mary Willis
• Will
• Miss Love
• Grandpa
• Miss. Effie Belle



♥ Setting ♥

•Grandpa's Store



♥ Themes ♥

• Technology Advancement


♥ Thematic Element ♥
Bringing new technology into town.


♥ Quotes ♥

• " It's in that old brown shoebox in the pantry with all Ma's other receipts. Unless you threw the box out."
-Mary Willis Page 256

• " You mean we go'n sell cars?"
-Will Page 259

• "We go'n get rich or go broke, grandpa?"
-Will Page 259

• " I call it hocus-pocus."
-Grandpa Page 260


♥ Chapter 37 Summary ♥

In chapter 37 Will and his grandfather are discussing the automobiles. They are talking about giving lessons to the people in Cold Sassy. Will is very excited about bringing the cars in and seeing everyones reaction to something so new. They are planing all the ways that they can teach the towns people to drive. They are so excited about how to bring it in also.


♥♥♥ Child Labor ♥♥♥

The shameful practice of child labor should have played an important role in the Industrial Revolution. In 1840 only twenty percent of the children of London had any schooling. Many Children worked 16 hour days under atrocious conditions. Children 9-11 were allowed to work 8 hour days. Some children were put to work at age 5 at the textile industry. Over 250 million child labourers are being exploited for the profit or are forced to work in order to survive. Whole generations of children were being deprived of the chance to take their rightful place in the society and economy of the 21 century.

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Chapter 38
Summary:
In chapter 38, Grandpa discusses the business with both Miss Love and Will Tweedy. They discuss what he is getting and Miss Love comes up with ideas to improve on how people will find out. Will also wonders about the trip and what exactly happened, considering the two Blakslees are awfully close now. Will finds out that Lightfoot’s father has died and that she’s working full time at the mill, gaining the information from Hosie. This starts yet another fight between Hosie and Will, resulting in them to go help Mr. Billy although they just trick him.

Characters:
• Grandpa Blakeslee
• Miss Love
• Will Tweedy
• Loomis
• Mama
• Aunt Loma
• Lightfoot McLendon
• Hosie Roach
• Miss Bertha
• Mr. Billy
• Papa
• Uncle Camp
• Cudn Hope
• Uncle Lige
• Mary Toy

Setting:
Mostly at the Blakeslee house, although there are scenes at the school house.

Thematic Elements:
Men’s stubbornness in the 19th century.

Significant Quotes:
1) “Thet woman shore has got her a head for bizness.” – Grandpa, page 264
2) “Ain’t I got enough to worry bout, buyin’ thet dang artermobile” – Grandpa, page 265
3) “Doggit, woman, I never seen the likes a-you.” – Grandpa, page 265
4) “She gettin’ on all right?” – Will Tweedy, page 266
5) “Says who, linthead?” – Will Tweedy, page 267
6) “Doggit to heck, I ain’t go’n let no more a-you dange boys cut no more a-my dang stovewood.” – Mr. Billy, page 277
7) “He cain’t say don’t drive it.” – Grandpa, page 267


Chapter 39:
Summary:
In chapter 39, Grandpa finally gets his brand new Pierce. The whole town shows up for it and it is considered to be bigger then even if the Georgia governor came down. Will drives them back home and things go well, except Miss Love doesn’t show up for the celebration. By the end of the chapter, Will attempts to teach Grandpa and Miss Love to drive with neither of them succeeding.

Characters:
• Grandpa Blakeslee
• Miss Love
• Will Tweedy
• Papa
• Mama
• Aunt Loma
• Uncle Camp
• Mary Toy
• Loomis
• Lightfoot McLendon
• Mr. Horace
• Miz Boswell
• Jedge
• Miz Landrum
• Cudn George
• Sara Ann
• Miss Mattie Lou
• Mr. Birdsong
• Mr. Tuttle
• Mr. Rucker
• Mr. Goosby
• Mr. Sheffield
• Queeine

Setting:
Railroad depot, Grandpa’s store, Tweedy house, Blakeslee house, and Jefferson Road.

Thematic Element:
Automobiles occurrence in small towns and learning to drive.

Significant Quotes:
1) “Said they’d say she talked me into buyin’ thet big artermobile.” – Grandpa, page 271
2) “Thet woman is stubborn, great goodness!” – Grandpa, page 271
3) “You done got yo’se’f a chariot!” – Loomis, page 272
4) “I ain’t aimin’ to have the only Pierce in town for long!” – Grandpa, page 273
5) “That’s poetic justice, considerin’.” – Aunt Loma, page 274
6) “ You go’n learn me and her how to drive this here thang!” – Grandpa, page 275
7) “You get a knack for that by doin’ it.” – Grandpa, page 277


Chapters 40 and 41:

-Chapter 40 Summary-
People in Cold Sassy started messing with the automobiles, so Grandpa decided to move them to the back. He wouldn't buy Miss Love a mannequin, so she became one herself. They go on a motor trip all day Sunday so, just Grandpa Blakeslee, Miss Love, and Will. On the way home, they had to swerve into a creek to avoid a wreck and got a hole in the radiator. On the way back from getting water, he saw Grandpa and Miss Love kissing. He hid behind a tree, so they wouldn't know he saw them. He felt betrayed and angry that Miss Love would do that.

-Chapter 41 Summary-
They manage to get the car to Cushie Springs, a small town a couple miles up the road. They find a nice old couple to let them stay the night, and sent word to Athens for a mechanic. Miss Love seemed awkward and nervous around Grandpa that evening because of the kiss. They decide, against Grandpa's wishes, for he and Will to sleep on the bed and Miss Love on the cot. That night, thinking Will was asleep, Grandpa snuck into Miss Love's room, and Will could hear everything said. He can tell that there's kissing going on, then Miss Love tries to push him away. Grandpa tells her how he's always loved her and wanted to be with her, even when Granny was still alive. Miss Love tells her Grandpa how her dad raped her when she was 12 years old and how her mom died. She tells him to leave her alone so he goes back to his room, but not back to bed. He just stands staring out the window. The mechanic comes early the next morning and they returned home. Grandpa rode in the front seat.

-Characters-
  • Grandpa: old-fashioned, opinionated. He shocks the whole town when he marries the young, pretty yankee milliner at the store three weeks after his wife died. In chapter 41, he takes Miss Love on a day trip with Will driving and he and Miss Love become much closer. Will sees Miss Love and him kissing.
  • Miss Love: polite, pretty, from Maryland, hired by Mr. Blakeslee as mariner, in thirties. She marries Mr. Blakeslee after his wife dies to become his housekeeper, but it later progresses into something more. No one in the town likes her. In these chapters, she has a good time on the trip with Mr. Blakeslee. She can see his true feelings for her now, and she reveals to him her deepest secret.
  • Aunt Loma: mean, dramatic, thinks she's better than everyone, prima donna. She is married to Camp who she thinks is good for nothing(later commits suicide) and has a baby. She is jealous of Miss Love when she poses in the window like a mannequin, because she is the center of attention.
  • Hoyt Tweedy: respectable, hard-working, reasonable. He is one of the few people in Cold Sassy that is nice to Miss Love, even though his wife hates her. He works at the store for Grandpa Blakeslee. He plans on going on the trip, but when they plan on leaving early, he decides not to go so he won't miss church.
  • Mr. Billy Whisnant: old man with rheumatism; mad at Will for cutting his wood too long, comes into the store to get some linament.
  • Will Tweedy: mischievious, imaginative, adventurous, likes Lightfoot McLendon, almost gets hit by a train, Mr. Blakeslee's grandson; he drives Miss Love and Grandpa on their day trip, but they don't pay much attention to him. When the radiator breaks, he has to go get water from the negro shack, and on the way back, sees them kiss. He also hears their whole conversation that night.
  • Driver of the Ford: man from Athens, wrecks his car. Grandpa and Will help him get the car off its side and going again.
  • Negro woman: "auntie", lives in a shack near the place they wrecked, lends them some water and grits, old and slow.
  • Mr. Nolly's son: young man visiting his parents in Cushie Springs, works in Athens, takes a message to call Hoyt and tell him they won't be home till tomorrow, sends for Mr. Shackleford to fix the car.
  • Mr. Nolly: little old man, Miss Gussie's husband, real name is Knowledge Henry Jameson, impressed by the Pierce, talks about his brother Big Dawg and a bow-legged yankee, and W.T. Stoddard.
  • Miss Gussie: sweet old woman, offers to let them stay the night, apologizes about not having plumbing and electricity, shows them to their rooms.

-Settings-
  • Store: owned by Grandpa Blakeslee; big, brick and nice, mahogony counters, beveled glass mirrors, big colored signs for coco-cola and other products, big sign out front in red and gold that says "General Merchandise" and underneath "Mr. E. Rucker Blakeslee, Proprietor".
  • Jefferson County Fair: carnival with booths, games, and rides.
  • Roads around Cold Sassy: dirt roads, single-track with deep wagon ruts and chuckholes, blue mountains in the distance.
  • Cushie Springs: get to it by following a creek on a narrow rutted wagon road; too small to be called a town, just a handfull of houses, no telephone poles.
  • Mr. Nolly and Miss Gussie's house: first house you come to in Cushie Springs, no plumbing or electricty-instead has kerosene lamps and a privy, steep staircase, neat plain room with old-timy furniture.
-Thematic Elements-
  • Romance
  • Betrayal
  • Honesty

-Quotes-
  • "Two elephants tied out yonder wouldn't draw costumers to the store as good as them artermobiles." -Grandpa, p. 281
  • "Thet's just fol-de-rol and foolish-ment." -Grandpa, p.282
  • "We's on our honeymoon!" -Loomis, p.286
  • "The automobile book calls this the cameraderie of the road!" -Miss Love, p.287
  • "Scuse me for astin', but ain't Miz Blakeslee a Yankee? She kind of talks like one." -Mr. Nolly, p. 294
  • "They spend every summer here with us, heppin' Mr. Nolly around the place." -Miss Gussie, p. 296
  • "I been waitin' for you a million years. I cain't wait no longer!" -Grandpa, p. 300
  • "I think I'd have done it for the piano." -Miss Love, p. 305
  • "Boy howdy, I slept like a log! Hope I didn't root you, sir." -Will, p. 311


*Research Topics*

-Dictionary of Popular Sayings-

1. Dog, bite your hide: Curse you
2. Don't say pea turkey: don't say anything
3. Money don't jump out at ya: money isn't just handed to you, you have to work for it
4. Don't have a gnat's chance: has no chance
5. Tuckered out: tired
6. Make haste: hurry
7. You won't slosh a drop: you won't mess up
8. "de sweetin' on de gingercake": romance
9. Knee-high to a gnat: small, short
10. Old yeller belly: scaredy-cat, chicken
11. Boy howdy: exclamation of enthusiasm or surprise
12. Roarin' like a freight train: loud
13. Good gosh a' mighty: goodness
14. Doggit: dang it
15. Out yonder: out there
16. By George: exclamtion of astonishment
17. I reckon: I guess so
18. Well, I'll be dog: expression of amazement
19. Got shet of it: got rid of it
20. Shore as sin: sure enough
21. In a fix: in trouble
22. Fittin': appropriate
23. Swell: good

-Jim Crowe Laws-
The Jim Crowe Laws mandated segregation in all public facilities. Schools, means of transportation, restrooms, and churches are all examples of places these laws took effect. They were supposed to create a "seperate but equal" status for black Americans and members of other non-white racial froups, but this was not the case. The white facilities were always much nicer. The Jim Crowe Laws were state and local laws in the United States enacted between 1876 and 1965.
State-sponsered school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crowe Laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
There were two specific injunctions of the Jim Crowe Laws for the state of Georgia: "All persons licensed to conduct a restaurant shall serve either white people exclusively or colored people exclusively or colored people exclusively and shall not sell to the two races within the same room or serve the two races anywhere under the same license." The other states it unlawful for any amateur white baseball team to play on any vacant lot or baseball diamond within two blocks of playground devoted to the negro race. The same goes for a black baseball team playing near a white playground.
The Jim Crow Laws relate to Cold Sassy Tree, because the Tweedys have black people that work for them. Queenie and Loomis aren't treated like slaves, but rather, part of the family. They still have to go to a seperate church and ride a different train, though. This segregation is due to the Jim Crowe Laws of the time.
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Chapter 42
Summary:
In chapter 42, Grandpa enters the contest to make a name for the hotel and wins by using his own name. He also gets sick in this chapter, although both he and Miss Love grow closer together. Will decides to pull a prank on Aunt Loma at the Christmas play and ruins it for her, after which she really hates him for it. Camp gets beat down even more when Hosie Roach asks for a job, since Grandpa says a few choice words about Camp.

Characters:
• Grandpa Blakeslee
• Miss Love
• Will Tweedy
• Mr. Clem Crummy
• Mr. Boop
• Mama
• Miss Pauline
• Doc
• Miss Effie Belle
• Aunt Loma
• Uncle Camp
• Campbell Junior
• Queenie
• Claude Wiggins
• Doodle
• Uncle Skinny
• Pink Predmore
• Lee Roy Sleep
• Smiley Snodgrass
• Chap Cheney
• Hosie Roach

Setting:
Cold Sassy Hotel, Blakeslee house, the school house, and Aunt Loma’s house.

Thematic Elements:
Elements of mystery, anger, and sadness.

Significant Quotes:
1) “If’n you don’t carry out the drawin’, I’ll sue for breach a-promise.” – Grandpa, page 314
2) “Rucker says it’s ketchin’ as sin.” – Doc, page 314
3) “ When you don’t know which way to turn, son, trying something. Don’t jest do nothin’.” – Grandpa, page 315
4) “Well, you can back out, but I ain’t.” – Will, page 317
5) “The one that should be apologizin’ is myself.” – Aunt Loma, page 321
6) “You sure are! You’re just sorry!” – Aunt Loma, page 322
7) “He’d be equal to three a-Camp.” – Grandpa, page 323


Chapter 43:
Summary:

In chapter 43, Aunt Loma goes off to Athens to spend time with a friend from college. Papa and Will go over to her house to help Camp with the faucet he was supposed to be fixing. Instead of fixing it, Camp shoots himself in the kitchen with Will and Papa in the next room. At the end, Will finds a note left for Loma and a still broken faucet. Will fixes it because he felt bad for Camp.

Characters:
• Uncle Camp
• Aunt Loma
• Sara Lee Gresham (Mrs. Humphry Wright)
• Papa
• Campbell Junior
• Mama
• Queenie
• Will Tweedy
• Papa
• Doc Slaughter
• Mr. Birdsong
• Mrs. Birdsong
• Mrs. Brown
• Grandpa

Setting:
Aunt Loma’s house.

Thematic Element:
A morbid air.

Significant Quotes:
1) “Said he couldn’t tackle the job with me standin’ there watchin’ him fail.” – Aunt Loma, page 325
2) “I… well, you know how Loma is.” – Camp, page 325
3) “I’m in the kitchen, Mr. Hoyt.” – Camp, page 325
4) “Run get Mr. Birdsong, son.” – Papa, page 326
5) “I loved you since the day I layed eyes on you.” – Camp, page 326
6) “so it aint you Loma baby its I aint good for nuthin.” – Camp, page 327
7) “i hope god will forgive me so I can meet you in heven.” – Camp, page 327♥♥